Friday, October 28, 2016

Rev. Jesse L. Jackson, Sr. statement



Media Contacts: Don Terry dterry@rainbowpush.org 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE October 26, 2016

 Water is Life, Stop the Dakota Access Pipeline 

A statement by Rev. Jesse L. Jackson, Sr. 

CANNONBALL, N.D. – Everywhere I went today, I was greeted with a simple but profound statement, “Water is life.” 

It was shouted by young children and ancient grandmothers, by a white man from Florida and four young Indian men on horseback. 

Water is life. 

I spent the day not far from here, as a proud member of the coalition of conscience, standing with the people of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and their courageous nonviolent crusade to stop the Dakota Access Pipeline. 

The construction of the $3.8 billion pipeline – which will carry 500,000 gallons of crude oil a day across four states – threatens the tribe’s sacred lands, burial sites and drinking water. But the people of Standing Rock are not mere protesters. They are protectors. {PROTECTORS}

Yet, they do not fight just for themselves. A stretch of the pipeline is scheduled to run below the Missouri River, the tribe’s water source. The river is also the source of water for 17 million people – mostly non-Natives – down river. 

A pipeline leak into the Missouri could be an environmental disaster of epic proportions. The water crisis in Flint, Michigan, as dangerous and disgraceful as it continues to be, impacted about 100,000 residents. 

The Native American plight is one of protracted genocide and dishonored treaties. They are unrepresented by the protection of law. The police are used as threat and intimidation. Native youth, I was told today, are eight times more likely to commit suicide than other American youth. Life expectancy for Native men and women is not much beyond middle-age. They need lifelines, not pipelines. 

The Standing Rock reservation is one of the poorest areas in the country and from what I saw and heard today one of the proudest and most determined to defend Mother Earth. They are like that tree planted near the water. They shall not be moved. 

I was moved, though. I was repeatedly greeted with warmth and prayer in the camp dotted with cooking fires, teepees and tents, home to more than 1,200 Native Americans from dozens of tribes and their allies from across the country and the world. Some days during the months-long campaign to safeguard the environment, three times that number has lived in the camp. 

I should say almost everywhere. Leaving the camp, headed for the airport, my colleagues and I were stopped at a police checkpoint. The officers were armed with assault rifles and grim faces as they confronted unarmed Americans. One of the officers had his finger near the trigger of his rifle during the entire 20 minutes of negotiations it took for them to allow us to pass. 

It was an unnecessary and ugly confrontation – and a tremendous waste of police resources. But this struggle is about more than a pipeline. It represents an indigenous resistance movement, a reawakening. I hope our nation does not continue to abandon our Native brothers and sisters. I will return to this prairie of hope as soon as I can. When I do, we will again stand together. We will pray together. We will learn and teach together. We will protect the water together and if need be, we will go to jail together to stop the pipeline. 

Water is life. 

Rev. Jesse L. Jackson, Sr. 


Founder and President Rainbow PUSH Coalition -30- Rainbow PUSH Coalition is a multi-racial, multi-issue, progressive, international organization thatwas formed in December 1996 by the Reverend Jesse L. Jackson, Sr. through merging of two organizations he founded Operation PUSH People United to Serve Humanity (estab. 1971) and the RainbowCoalition (estab. 1984). With headquarters in Chicago and offices in Washington, D.C., Atlanta, Detroit,Houston, Los Angeles, New York and Oakland, the organization works to make the American Dream a realityfor all citizens while advocating for peace and justice around the world. RPC is dedicated to improvingthe lives of all people by serving as a voice for the voiceless. Its mission is to protect, defend and gaincivil rights by leveling the economic and educational playing fields while promoting peace and justicearound the world. 

http://www.rainbowpush.org/page/-/Documents/PressRelease/Release102616.pdf

Wednesday, October 26, 2016

Dakota Access Pipeline continues to commit crimes against Humanity


Welcome to today's post from Alaska's Big Village Network providing real information AND a bit of satire addressing the ongoing Human Rights violations by a U.S. Corporation in the State of North Dakota.  Energy Transfer Partners' Dakota Access oil pipeline activities continue to break International Covenants and U.S. Laws using the State of North Dakota's political system to pursue violent means to enforce the false Western mythology of "progress and development".  Here are a few clips from Indian Country Today articulating on the ground observations from thousands of U.S. and global citizens.  - Alaska's Big Village Network 



Indian Country Today Media Network 10/25/16

A Call for Justice Dept to Act on DAPL Civil Rights Abuses

10/25/16
Concerned and angered by the use of dogs, pepper spray, military tactics and strip searches against unarmed water protectors at the construction sites of the Dakota Access oil pipeline, Standing Rock Sioux Chairman David Archambault II is asking the U.S. Department of Justice to step in.
“I am seeking a Justice Department investigation because I am concerned about the safety of the people,” Archambault said in a statement. “Too often these kinds of investigations take place only after some use of excessive force by the police creates a tragedy. I hope and pray that the Department will see the wisdom of acting now to prevent such an outcome.”

Read more at https://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2016/10/25/call-justice-dept-act-dapl-civil-rights-abuses-166205

 

Justice Dept Reaffirms It Will Not Grant DAPL River-Crossing Permits Anytime Soon

10/25/16
“While the Army continues to review issues raised by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and other tribal nations and their members, it will not authorize constructing the Dakota Access Pipeline on Corps land bordering or under Lake Oahe,” Justice Department spokesman Wyn Hornbuckle told the news station in an e-mail on Tuesday October 25. Earlier in the day, Standing Rock Sioux Chairman David Archambault II had requested a DOJ investigation into civil and human rights abuses by police and other authorities against the protectors. “In the interim, the departments of the Army, Interior, and Justice have reiterated our request that the pipeline company voluntarily pause all construction activity within 20 miles east or west of Lake Oahe.”



Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2016/10/25/justice-dept-reaffirms-it-will-not-grant-dapl-river-crossing-permits-anytime-soon-166208


1851 Fort Laramie Treaty




Now starring Oil is Life by the Dakota EXCESS Pipeline From The Juice Media (satire):

Behind the scenes  look into the Dakota EXCESS Pipeline:   
ADULT LANGUAGE WARNING



For folks wishing to find out more on how to support (click on):
 Standing Rock Sioux Reservation,
 Sacred Stones Camp, 
Red Warrior Camp and/or 
Oceti Sakowin (7 Fires) Camp.

 please contact Alaska's Big Village Network with additional questions.
email akbigvillage@gmail.com

Monday, October 24, 2016

1851 Treaty Honoring: Police beat Water Protectors with batons, pepper spray them during prayer: update from the field

10/24/16
ABVN traveled long and far this last week to witness the front line Prayers for Peace and Non-violence at the Camp of Sacred Stones and overflow camp Oceti Sakowin (seven council fires).

https://vimeo.com/groups/82929/videos/188723484

The journey of awareness building and prayers for peace is necessary to address the profound Human Rights implications of the State of North Dakota militarized violent tactics to protect corporate special interest over US Treaties, International Covenants of Human Rights and basic human dignity .  
The State-sponsored violence is causing significant harm to peaceful indigenous peoples, women, children, and elders praying in Honor and reverence for Mother Earth at the headwaters of the Mississippi-Missouri Watershed to Protect Water and Sacred Sites (freedom of Religion and religious spiritual sites).

 The territory at question of the Human Rights violations by North Dakota against Tribal Nations is occurring inside the 1851 Treaty of Fort Laramie lands currently occupied by Oceti Sakowin.

Yesterday, Water Protectors affirmed the 1851 Treaty of Fort Laramie by reclaiming the lands along the pipeline route near the Missouri River, just North of the Cannonball River.  The Oceti Sakowin are now directly challenging the legality of the Dakata Access Pipeline that threatens cultural survival and water for millions of American People.

http://sacredstonecamp.org/blog/2016/10/23/citing-1851-treaty-water-protectors-establish-road-blockade-and-expand-frontline-nodapl-camp







Brenda Norrell's also has more info below with pictures, updates and indigenous media at CENSORED NEWS http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/



Please listen to this interview by Grandma Carol Masden experience in this weekends violence that left many people harmed by violent police forces.    

1851 Treaty Honoring: Police beat Water Protectors with batons, pepper spray them during prayer: update from the field

10/24/16
ABVN traveled long and far this last week to witness the front line Prayers for Peace and Non-violence at the Camp of Sacred Stones and overflow camp Oceti Sakowin (seven council fires).

The journey of awareness building and prayers for peace is necessary to address the profound Human Rights implications of the State of North Dakota militarized violent tactics to protect corporate special interest over US Treaties, International Covenants of Human Rights and basic human dignity .  
The State-sponsored violence is causing significant harm to peaceful indigenous peoples, women, children, and elders praying in Honor and reverence for Mother Earth at the headwaters of the Mississippi-Missouri Watershed to Protect Water and Sacred Sites (freedom of Religion and religious spiritual sites).

 The territory at question of the Human Rights violations by North Dakota against Tribal Nations is occurring inside the 1851 Treaty of Fort Laramie lands currently occupied by Oceti Sakowin.

Yesterday, Water Protectors affirmed the 1851 Treaty of Fort Laramie by reclaiming the lands along the pipeline route near the Missouri River, just North of the Cannonball River.  The Oceti Sakowin are now directly challenging the legality of the Dakata Access Pipeline that threatens cultural survival and water for millions of American People.

http://sacredstonecamp.org/blog/2016/10/23/citing-1851-treaty-water-protectors-establish-road-blockade-and-expand-frontline-nodapl-camp







Brenda Norrell's also has more info below with pictures, updates and indigenous media at CENSORED NEWS http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/



Please listen to this interview by Grandma Carol Masden experience in this weekends violence that left many people harmed by violent police forces.    

Monday, October 17, 2016

Call out for Support!!!!! Standing Rock and Sacred Stones Camp

September 16, 2016

Alaska's Big Village Network-

Request for support the Peace Pony to Standing Rock and Sacred Stones Camp

WATER IS LIFE!
Unguvauguq meq!
(Yupik language)

Mni Wiconi!
(Lakota Language)
WATER IS LIFE!

Sacred Stones Camp- Supply and Support Mission to Standing Rock Reservation of the Hunkpapa Lakota and Yaktonai Dakota Territory

CONTACT: Carl Wassilie 574-387-8162 or 907-744-4903 carlwassilie.acyn@gmail.com
Who is Alaska's Big Village Network (ABVN)?

Alaska's Big Village Network (ABVN) is a free association of peoples whose mission is to create communities of inclusion between Indigenous Peoples and non-Indigenous Peoples for the betterment of healthy communities. ABVN believes the process of inclusion is healing for the health of all peoples with all due respect to the guidance and wisdom of the elders, reverence for Mother Earth and actions taking to protect the future generations.ABVN started in the nexus of Alaska's biggest indigenous village, which is the current modern city of Anchorage, Alaska, where 100s of languages and cultures are shared from around the world.

ABVN is currently on a long road journey across the Salmon territories that connect to inland waters of the Bison territories in which thousands of communities and hundreds of indigenous communities call home.


What is ABVN doing?

The Peace Pony (cargo/passenger van) is bringing 4 people with diverse skill sets and some supplies to stand with Standing Rock and the Water Protectors. We just need some support with gas and emergency hotel/shelter for the drive out and back to the Pacific Northwest. We are starting this call out for support from the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Reservation in Montana and will be driving East on I-90 to the Missouri River to the Sacred Stones camp on the Cannonball River drainage of the Hunkpapa Lakota and Yaktonai Dakota territories.

ABVN has cargo van of supplies and skilled personal to work with Standing Rock relations to ensure safe communication as well as passenger transport to and from Sacred Stones camp. With winter season coming and global climate induced warming and unusual oscillating temperatures and the high probability of extreme weather events, we will assist in continued development of tribal emergency response communications and support tribal initiatives. We have some skills at winter builds/camping, cooking, winter survival and basic emergency response management.

This leg of the journey includes bringing some colder weather gear, tarps, cooking stoves and solar lights to assist the campers braving the colder weather this changing season. ABVN is continuing to providing collaborative personal and professional networking support for Standing Rock and front line Water Protectors helping to ensure safe and peaceful relations.


What do we need?

ABVN needs
Immediately to reach camp:
a) gas cards (money) for the cargo van, $450 for the trip
b) 1-2 hotel rewards/coupons – emergency shelter(cash).

Can transport and/or help facilitate the delivery of the following to camp:
c) An inverter (or gift card for an inverter)
d) medical kits and medical supplies
e) childrens school supplies
f) wool materials such as blankets, clothing, socks, hats, etc.
g) winter pants/bibs and jackets (including Carhart cold weather pants, outdoor bibs, etc)
h) indigenous foods- wild foods- dried/canned fish and meats
I) firewood
k) work gloves
l) more legal observers, medics, cold weather builders
m) meals for families
n) marine radios
o) cold weather sleeping gear such as extreme cold military sleeping bags\
p) generators/heaters/stoves

For more info and background check out:



CONTACT: Carl Wassilie 574-387-8162 or 907-744-




Why is Alaska's Big Village Network (ABVN) bringing supplies and support to Sacred Stones Camp Water Protectors?


ABVN recently completed a road trip providing creative art, music, food and basic support with front-line indigenous communities addressing restoration of sacred salmon. We traveled from the inland waters of the Columbia River Watershed, participating in the Free the Snake River Flotilla in solidarity with Niimiipoo (Nez Pierce), Save our Wild Salmon, Backbone Campaign and Mosquito Fleet in supporting efforts to take the dams down and let the Chinook Salmon run freely again along the Snake River. 

http://www.freethesnake.com/



 After floating on the water with inland canoe families and kayakers, we travelled by van down to Mt. Shasta watershed to support the prayer journey and honor the 300-mile Run 4 Salmon by the Winnemem Wintu to restore and protect healthy Rivers along the historical journey of the Chinook salmon from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta to the Winnemem (McCloud River) addressing policies threatening waters, indigenous cultural survival and lifeways.

http://www.run4salmon.org/ 




ABVN recognizes and respects the wisdom of the elders standing up to the past sufferings of hundreds of years of colonial oppression and are now calling for Prayers for Peace of Humankind and learn to respect the Rights of Mother Earth. ABVN also gives reverence and honor for the young Indigenous Runners for Peace and Dignity as they inherit the responsibilities to our Future Generations. ABVN acknowledges the Human Rights of Children to a Clean Environment. ABVN also recognizes the civic duties of Human Beings to ensure Indigenous Peoples cultural survival as critical for Wisdom keepers in healing the planet; we call Mother Earth.

What is the camp?
The camp is full of peaceful people praying and gathering for future generations to Water and challenging the Black Snake (DAPL) as it attempts to carry poison (crude oil) across an industrial pipeline; threatening and putting at high risk millions of American children' and pregnant mothers' drinking water.

ABVN is acutely aware of the largest indigenous gathering in modern history, with Tribes and global civic society supporting the Water Protectors. ABVN is contributing to the spiritual uprising of global civic society and human beings to return harmony with Mother Earth and are conduits for Peace, Freedom of Speech, and Non-Violent Direct Action to highlight the disparities that Human Beings have against western desires. We pray for the Return of America's Wild Bison, America's Wild Salmon and Food Security for Children.

ABVN acknowledges this historic moment of communication between the United States of America and Tribal Governments regarding preservation of Sacred Landscapes, Sacred Sites and Sacred Waters in the line of the Western Myth of “progress and development”. The implications of the United States Government and States political actions and policies impact hundreds of Tribal Governments in Alaska on waters, freedom of Religion, Historic Artifacts and Cultural Sites of spiritual significance for Cultural Survival (of all Human Beings- universal declaration).


The black snake attempting to be created for this western myth is today is the pipeline of Balkan crude oil via Dakota Access Pipeline (aka poisonous black snake prophecy) threatening the climate-induced biological fragility of America's “bread basket”.
As well as the main source of Life for the indigenous peoples of the plains, the waters of the Mississippi and Missouri watershed bio-regions provide for millions of Americans in one of North America's biggest watersheds that supports America's drinking water, grain lines, livestock, fisheries and food sources for hundreds of millions of people.



Friday, October 14, 2016

Sacred Stones Camp- September 2016



Tribal Historical Overview - Lakota Migration - The 1851 Fort Laramie Treaty


The Standing Rock Sioux Reservation is situated in North Dakota and South Dakota. The people of Standing Rock, often called Sioux, are members of the Dakota and Lakota nations. “Dakota” and “Lakota” mean “friends” or “allies.” The people of these nations are often called “Sioux,” a term that dates back to the 17th century when the people were living in the Great Lakes area. The Ojibwa called the Lakota and Dakota “Nadouwesou” meaning “adders.” This term, shortened and corrupted by French traders, resulted in retention of the last syllable as “Sioux.” There are various Sioux divisions and each has important cultural, linguistic, territorial, and political distinctions. The Standing Rock Indian Reservation is a Hunkpapa Lakota andYanktonai Dakota Indian reservation in North Dakota and South Dakota in the United States.


Thursday, July 16, 2015

Cook Inlet Beluga Whale Recovery Plan? indigenous input?

The Orca and Beluga represent "communities sharing together" logo by Ole Lake, ABVN adviser
 Despite only having a few hours to put together comments on the on-going extreme environmental racism saga of the Cook Inlet Beluga Whale and Alaska Native hunters, I was able to scramble up what I saw missing in the 289-page plan.  Despite the government taking over 10 years to finally come up with a plan after spending 30 years blaming Alaska Native hunters and creating massive regulatory controls on hunters, they have finally created a plan.   All this is while the Cook Inlet Municipalities, Boroughs, Military and Industries all have free reign to dump sewage, anit-freeze (airports), munitions, oil, drilling fluids (including radioactive materials), etc.   

The list goes on and on for allowing "Progress and Development" to continue in Cook Inlet, while the most restricted group of peoples are local indigenous peoples, whom the government blames for Beluga population declines. while they ignore their own laws on pollution and egregious dumping in the Beluga birthing grounds.   This shows folks what is really to come in the Arctic as we continue to allow American laws and regulations to be bypassed for "progress and development" of the "last frontier".

Here's a few words in the saga addressing the most racist environmental case in Alaska:



7/14/15
Public Comment
By Carl Wassilie, Yupiaq Biologist
Alaska’s Big Village Network
  RE:  National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Notice: Endangered and Threatened Species; Draft Recovery Plan for the Cook Inlet Beluga Whale



Thank you for this opportunity to comment on this extremely important document regarding Recovery of the Cook Inlet Beluga Whale (Beluga) that indigenous peoples of Cook Inlet have been gravely concerned about since time immemorial.   Cook Inlet Tribes have developed Recovery Plans for the Cook Inlet Beluga Whale as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) listed the Beluga under the federal Endanger Species Act (ESA).  The inter-tribal ordinance for the Recovery is included in the Cook Inlet Marine Mammal Councils minutes in 2005. [ORDINANCE 042005-01]



The National Marine Fisheries Service Draft Recovery Plan for the Cook Inlet Beluga Whale (Beluga) fails to provide a full picture of historic, ongoing threats and potential catastrophic effects within the full seasonal ranges of the Cook Inlet Beluga Whale.  The missing pieces in this plan includes the Beluga’s migratory pathway and the food species for the Beluga that also migrates outside of the “feeding” areas and “birthing” areas that are threatened.  The Beluga and the species the Beluga feeds on are all traditional food sources for thousands of indigenous peoples and multiple cultural groups in the Cook Inlet and North Pacific Regions.
Due to the timing of the public comment period during fishing season and summer activities on the land and water, many local fisher-peoples and indigenous communities have not been able to comment.
Additionally, the 289 page document can be overwhelming for indigenous communities whose English is limited and proficiency may be lacking.   The effects of the decimation and continued decline in the health of the Cook Inlet Beluga Whale is a concern to all indigenous peoples that historically traded beyond NOAAs scope and regional Tribal outreach that should include across mountain passes to the West and to the North as noted by Shem Pete’s historical analysis.
I have broken my comments based on my indigenous perception of the NMFS Draft Recovery Plan into 3 categories of missing information:   Military, Oil spills, Earthquakes

A.       Military
The Navy is completely left out of the entire document despite the historic, ongoing and potential threats and effects on the Beluga recovery.   Especially important is identifying the effects of military sonar on all living organisms.
As recent as May 6, 2015, the city of Cordova, Alaska, passed a resolution “to oppose Navy Training Exercises in the Gulf of Alaska in June 2015.”   Eyak Preservation Council protested on May 16, 2015, with over 100 boats and hundreds in a peaceful demonstration against the Navy's planned live fire training activities in the Gulf of Alaska.


According to the EIS preferred plans, these "war games" will involve use of high frequency and mid-frequency sonar for submarine exercises, plus a wide variety of live weapons and explosives deployment - bombs, heavy deck guns, torpedoes, missiles, large carrier strikes (ships blown up & sunk) none of which will ever be recovered. Although military training exercises have been conducted in the GOA intermittently for the last 30 years, those proposed in the current EIS are a massive increase from any conducted before
(e.g. a 6,500% increase in sonobuoys).

The Navy has applied for permits to conduct training exercises in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) for up to 42 days (from April to October) annually for a five-year period. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is the permitting agency with support from the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS). The Navy is required to complete a supplemental EIS (to be released 01/2016) that included a 60-day comment period from August to October of 2014. The Supplemental EIS will be for the next round of permits (2016 – 2021). Previous trainings for 2010 – 2015 were permitted, yet no trainings have been conducted yet. 2015 is the first year these trainings will take place.”
Emily Stolarcyk / Eyak Preservation Council

B.       Oil spills
                Exxon Valdez Oil Spill (EVOS) has had significant effects and continues to harm the North Pacific Ecosystem.   EVOS has had short-term and long-term impacts that continues to directly affect food availability of multiple species for the Cook Inlet Beluga Whale.   Indigenous Science and Knowledge confirms some of the results of ecosystem science completed over the years on the Gulf of Alaska and effects of the EVOS.
                The chronic discharge of oil and hazardous substances by the oil and gas industry over the lifetime of activities in Cook Inlet still has yet to be examined comprehensively despite organizations such as Cook Inlet Keeper insistence to evaluate “authorized” discharges into the critical habitat of the Beluga.

Spread of Oil from the 1989 Exxon Valdez ongoing disaster


C.       Earthquake- 1964
The 1964 Earthquake was an extremely catastrophic event in Cook Inlet that was completely left out of the Background of the Recovery Plan and was significant for a multitude of reasons.   The 1964 Earthquake not only changed the physical habitat and altered some of the localized nutrient cycles.   Toxic chemicals and damaged infrastructure also leaked into Cook Inlet and Gulf of Alaska from the 1964 Earthquake.   

The Great Alaska Earthquake and Tsunami of March 27, 1964